Call for 2017 Annual WCSA Award Submissions

The Working-Class Studies Association (WCSA) invites nominations (including self-nominations) for awards covering the year of 2017.

Award categories are:

  • Tillie Olsen Award for Creative Writing: Published books of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and other genres
  • C.L.R. James Award for Published Books for Academic or General Audiences
  • Russo & Linkon Award for Published Article or Essay for Academic or General Audiences
  • Studs Terkel Award for Media and Journalism: Single published articles or series, broadcast media, multimedia, and film
  • Constance Coiner Award for Best Dissertation: Completed dissertations only

In all categories, we invite nominations of excellent work that provides insightful and engaging depictions of working-class life, culture, and movements; addresses issues related to the working class; and highlights the voices, experiences, and perspectives of working-class people.

To be eligible, works must have been published (in the case of books or articles) or completed (in the case of films and dissertations) between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017.

To nominate a work for consideration, please send three hard copies with a cover letter, identifying the category in which the work is being nominated and a brief explanation of why it deserves recognition.  Please note: articles and dissertations should be submitted in electronic form.

Nominations are due by January 15, 2018.

 

Submit nominations to:

Dr. Michele Fazio

Associate Professor of English

University of North Carolina at Pembroke

1 University Drive

Pembroke, NC  28372

For more information and to submit electronic submissions, contact:    Michele Fazio, WCSA Past-President at michele.fazio@uncp.edu.

 

Winners will be announced at the 2018 Working-Class Studies Association conference to be held June 6-9, 2018 at the Center for the Study of Inequalities, Social Justice, & Policy at Stony Brook University.  Winners will receive free conference registration and a plaque at the WCSA Annual Awards Ceremony. In addition, a panel session will be reserved in the conference program to feature a discussion of award recipients’ work.  Conference attendance is strongly encouraged.

Details of the awards and past winners can be found here.

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2017 WCSA Conference at Indiana University at Bloomington is underway!

The Working-Class Studies 2017 Conference, “Class Struggle: Race, Gender, and Revolution,” began with its annual Meet & Greet on Wednesday evening.  It was a large turnout of new and familiar faces.  A film screening of “The Killing Floor” followed at the IU Cinema.

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Final call for proposals for The Routledge International Handbook of Working Class Studies

Call For Proposals

The Routledge International Handbook of Working Class Studies

Co-editors: Michele Fazio (UNC Pembroke), Christie Launius (UW Oshkosh), and Tim Strangleman (University of Kent)

Deadline: May 1, 2017

The co-editors of The Routledge International Handbook of Working Class Studies (under contract with Routledge Press) are seeking proposals for chapters. While we have lined up many contributors already, we are now soliciting proposals to round out the volume.  

The book will be organized into eight sections.  The first section will be an editorial introduction that will provide a brief history of the field, as well as sketch out its current status.  The final section will be entitled “New Directions in Working Class Studies,” and will bring together, in dialogue, voices representing the field’s founding as well as voices of the next generation of scholars, teachers, and activists.  The remaining six sections will be thematic in focus, and will each contain 4-5 chapters: Methods, Class and Education, Work and Community, Working-Class Cultures, Representations, and Activism and Collective Action.  The complete prospectus can be made available via the contact information below.  

 We are seeking proposals for chapters in each of the six thematic sections. The completed essays will be 5,000-6,000 words in length. 

If you would like to propose a chapter for the volume, please submit a 1-page proposal that includes a title, description of the proposed chapter, and the section that it would be included in.  Please also provide a short CV and a brief paragraph that describes your involvement in the field.  

Deadline for proposals: May 1st, 2017 (with notification of acceptance or rejection by early June)

First drafts of chapters are due on August 1st, 2017.  We plan to have comments back to all contributors by mid-October, and will collect revised manuscripts from all contributors by January 2018.  

Please send materials via e-mail to Christie Launius at <launiusc@uwosh.edu>.

CfP: The Routledge International Handbook of Working Class Studies

Call For Proposals

The Routledge International Handbook of Working Class Studies

Co-editors: Michele Fazio (UNC Pembroke), Christie Launius (UW Oshkosh), and Tim Strangleman (University of Kent)

Deadline: May 1, 2017

The co-editors of The Routledge International Handbook of Working Class Studies (under contract with Routledge Press) are seeking proposals for chapters. While we have lined up many contributors already, we are now soliciting proposals to round out the volume.  

The book will be organized into eight sections.  The first section will be an editorial introduction that will provide a brief history of the field, as well as sketch out its current status.  The final section will be entitled “New Directions in Working Class Studies,” and will bring together, in dialogue, voices representing the field’s founding as well as voices of the next generation of scholars, teachers, and activists.  The remaining six sections will be thematic in focus, and will each contain 4-5 chapters: Methods, Class and Education, Work and Community, Working-Class Cultures, Representations, and Activism and Collective Action.  The complete prospectus can be made available via the contact information below.  

 We are seeking proposals for chapters in each of the six thematic sections. The completed essays will be 5,000-6,000 words in length. 

If you would like to propose a chapter for the volume, please submit a 1-page proposal that includes a title, description of the proposed chapter, and the section that it would be included in.  Please also provide a short CV and a brief paragraph that describes your involvement in the field.  

Deadline for proposals: May 1st, 2017 (with notification of acceptance or rejection by early June)

First drafts of chapters are due on August 1st, 2017.  We plan to have comments back to all contributors by mid-October, and will collect revised manuscripts from all contributors by January 2018.  

Please send materials via e-mail to Christie Launius at <launiusc@uwosh.edu>.

Presenting Working-Class Studies in Italy

Michele Fazio, current President of the WCSA, served as a visiting professor in the Cultura e Letteratura Italiana-Americana (CLIA) graduate program at the Università della Calabria in October.  Her lectures explored the intersections between ethnicity and class in 2oth-century and contemporary Italian American literature.  She also presented her current research project on the music of Woody Guthrie, performing a selection of labor songs from the 1930s to the present.

fazio_working-classclass-photo-clia-oct-2016

 

 

 

New Journal of Working-Class Studies Now Online

The Working-Class Studies Association is pleased to announce The Journal of Working-Class StudiesJWCS is an online, open-access, interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal that brings together the work of scholars, writers, artists and activists who are committed to the study and representation of working-class life. We aim to publish writing about the global working class – a diverse group of people whose commonality is their position in classed societies.

The inaugural issue features an introduction by editors Sarah Attfield and Liz Giuffre; articles by leaders in the field of working-class studies such as Sherry Lee Linkon, John Russo, Jack Metzgar, and Michael Zweig; and work from emerging voices whose scholarship focuses on the many intersections of class. Also included are reviews of books by Tim Sheard, Michelle Tokarczyk and George Lakey.

We invite submissions that contribute significant knowledge to our understanding of who the global working class(es) are and have been, as well as what it means to ‘study’ class, conceptually and as a socio-economic reality. We especially encourage work that explores how class intersects with other vectors of identity and experience, including race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, ability, and citizenship status.  The journal reviews books that feature working-class people, communities, culture, history, politics, and/or experience as a crucial component of their scholarly or artistic vision. We also invite artists to submit short comics or excerpts of longer works. For further information about submissions, please visit our “Instructions for Authors” page.

Formed in 2003, the Working-Class Studies Association is an international organization which promotes the study of working-class people and their culture. The Working-Class Studies Association is made up of academics, activists, teachers, writers, poets, journalists, practitioners, students, artists and a wide range of others interested in developing the field of working-class studies. The organization holds an annual conference as well as other events to promote the field (including a variety of awards), and act as a discussion forum for working-class issues. The organization is based in North America and has members world-wide.

We hope you will enjoy the new Journal of Working-Class Studies!

To contact the founding editors, Sarah Attfield and Liz Giuffre, please email editorial@workingclassstudiesjournal.com.

The Journal of Working-Class Studies is published by the Working-Class Studies Association c/o The Texas Center for Working-Class Studies, Collin College, Spring Creek Campus, 2800 E. Spring Creek Parkway, Plano, Texas 75074, USA.

 

Panel on Systematic Racism at Northampton Community College

Karen Gaffney recently spoke on a panel alongside Tim Wise, Prof. Denise Francois-Seeney, and Prof. Kamau Kenyatta about anti-racism at Northampton Community College in Bethlehem, PA. Prof. Jim Von Schilling moderated the panel. It was a great discussion attended by an audience of at least 150 people about the persistence of systemic racism, strategies for ending white supremacy, how everyone can take action, and the inspiring work of Black Lives Matter activists.img_7889-1