Roundtable discussion of the Routledge International Handbook of Working-Class Studies

Join us for a roundtable discussion of the new Routledge International Handbook of Working-Class Studies on April 16, 2021 at 11 am – 12:15 pm EST via Zoom.

Advance registration is required.

The Routledge International Handbook of Working-Class Studies is a timely volume that provides an overview of this interdisciplinary field that emerged in the 1990s in the context of deindustrialization, the rise of the service economy, and economic and cultural globalization. The Handbook brings together scholars, teachers, activists, and organizers from across three continents to focus on the study of working-class peoples, cultures, and politics in all their complexity and diversity.  

Panelists include contributors:  

Sherry Linkon, Georgetown University  

Colby King, University of South Carolina Upstate  

Simon Lee, Texas State University  

Allison Hurst, Oregon State University  

And co-editors Michele Fazio, Christie Launius, and Tim Strangleman  

Moderated by Jack Metzgar, Professor Emeritus, Roosevelt University  

Call for Annual Awards

The Working-Class Studies Association calls for nominations for our annual awards. Please consider nominating an entry, and please circulate the attached call.

Our award categories are:

  • Studs Terkel Award: for single published articles or series, broadcast media, multimedia, and film in media and journalism
  • Tillie Olsen Award for Creative Writing: for published books of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and other genres
  • C.L.R. James Award: for Published Books for Academic or General Audiences
  • Jake Ryan and Charles Sackrey Award: for books by writer(s) of working-class origins that speak to issues of the working-class academic experience
  • Russo & Linkon Award: for published article or essay for academic or general audiences
  • Constance Coiner Award: for completed dissertations
  • Lifetime Achievement Award

In all categories, we invite nominations of excellent work that provides insightful and engaging depictions of working-class life, culture, and movements; addresses issues related to the working class; and highlights the voices, experiences, and perspectives of working-class people.

To be eligible, works must have been published (in the case of books or articles) or completed (in the case of films and dissertations) between January 1, 2020 and December 31, 2020.

Details of the awards and past winners can be found here.

To nominate a work for consideration, please send three hard copies with a cover letter, identifying the category in which the work is being nominated and a brief explanation of why it deserves recognition, to the address below. The nominating party, whether author or publisher–has the responsibility to make sure three copies with a cover letter are submitted. NOTE: Articles and dissertations should be submitted in electronic form to <scott.henkel@uwyo.edu>.

For the Lifetime Achievement Award, please submit a detailed letter of nomination (or self-nomination) to <scott.henkel@uwyo.edu>. The letter should document the range of the nominees’ contributions to the field of Working-Class Studies and the advancement of working-class causes, whether in or beyond higher education. 

Nominations are due no later than January 31, 2021.

Submit nominations to:

Dr. Scott Henkel

Wyoming Institute for Humanities Research

Cooper House

Department 3353

University of Wyoming

1000 E. University Ave.

Laramie, WY 82071

Black Lives Matter Solidarity Statement from the Working-Class Studies Association

The Working-Class Studies Association releases the following statement (also downloadable as a PDF here) in support of the Black Lives Matter movement and standing in solidarity with people around the world who are protesting against racist violence and fighting for racial justice:

Black Lives Matter

The Working-Class Studies Association supports the Black Lives Matter movement and stands in solidarity with people around the world who are protesting against racist violence and fighting for racial justice. Racism and racialized violence is, and has always been, interconnected with capitalist and colonial systems of oppression and exploitation.  In this regard, we stand strongly in support of the interconnected movements that are working to transform these violent and rapacious structures of racial capitalism which continue to perpetuate violence against racialized communities of color and formerly colonized peoples on every continent.  It is long past time to end that system, and bring a new world from the ashes of the old.

Black Lives Matter.

The history of the United States is a violently racist one, beginning with white settler colonists committing genocide on and dispossessing Native people from their lands, and violently enslaving and exploiting the labor of Black people. American society is still fundamentally structured by the continuing oppression of Black and racially minoritized peoples, systemic institutional racism, and economic exploitation.   This historical and ongoing structural racism creates the violence seen in police forces across the country and is responsible for the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and the many other predominantly Black and Brown victims of police brutality. Such killings are a part of a long and ongoing history of lynching where violent racist white men – both police and civilian – murder Black people with impunity.

This kind of violent structural racism is not confined to the United States. In the UK, the police also disproportionality target Black and racialized ethnic minority people.  The police killing of Mark Duggan in 2011 sparked days of protest across the UK. In 2018 the British government unjustly deported members of the Windrush Generation – Black workers from the Caribbean who were invited to emigrate to Britain in the 1950s and 1960s. Australia was also built through white settler colonial violence.  The state continues its long history of murdering and incarcerating Indigenous people.  Since 1991, 437 Indigenous people have died in police custody in Australia. For centuries, racial capitalism and white settler colonialism have engaged in the systematic looting of the resources of the majority of the world’s Black, Brown and working-class communities. It has created misery and despair for Black and Brown peoples around the globe.  This must end.

Black Lives Matter.

In addition to being a contemporary example of racist police violence, as a working-class Black man, George Floyd’s situation of being laid off and looking for work due to the Covid19 pandemic also exemplifies another dimension of racial inequality that has been experienced disproportionately by Black and racially minoritized working-class people. The current crisis has clearly shown that Black and racially minoritized  people are made particularly vulnerable to the virus and to the economic effects of the pandemic by ongoing structural racism across nearly every institution. It reveals the ways that insecure work, homelessness, food insecurity, lack of adequate medical care, and underfunded educational institutions, lead to the poverty and despair that is then left to be solved through police violence, especially in racially minoritized working-class communities.

While the privileged few of the white and wealthy have been able to shield themselves from the worst effects of the pandemic, Black, Brown and working-class people have lost their jobs or have been forced to risk their health and lives by continuing to work  in essential roles, often for low wages and in unsafe conditions. We are not in this together. Black and Brown working-class communities have been brutally exploited for their labor and have suffered and died in disproportionate numbers due to these ongoing and institutionalized systems of inequality.

Black Lives Matter.

The Working-Class Studies Association is an international organization which promotes the study of transnational, multiracial working-class people and their cultures. We are a group made up of academics, activists, teachers, writers, poets, journalists, practitioners, students, artists and a wide range of others interested in developing the field of working-class studies. The aim of the Association is to highlight the diverse lives and experiences of multi-racial and multi-ethnic working-class peoples around the world. It also seeks to reveal how class works by examining capitalist class-based systems of inequality in order to advocate for a more just world for multiracial working-class peoples. Members of the Working-Class Studies Association live and work in many different countries and contexts and work to fight race and class-based inequalities and discrimination in our respective communities.

The Working-Class Studies Association loudly and with one voice condemns all forms of racist oppression and calls for an end to racist police violence. We commit ourselves, as both individual members, and as an organization, to working in solidarity with Black, Brown and working-class communities to dismantle ongoing systems of racial capitalism.

Black Lives Matter.

Reminder: Proposals for WCSA 2020 Conference Due THIS WEEK – Feb. 20!

Proposals for the Working-Class Studies Association’s 2020 conference, on RE-PLACING CLASS: COMMUNITY, POLITICS, WORK, AND LABOR IN A CHANGING WORLD, are due Feb. 20, 2020.

The conference will be held May 20-23, 2020 at Youngstown State University, in Youngstown, Ohio, and more information is available at the conference website, here.

2020 con logo

Reminder: Proposals for WCSA 2020 Conference Due Feb. 20!

Proposals for the Working-Class Studies Association’s 2020 conference, on RE-PLACING CLASS: COMMUNITY, POLITICS, WORK, AND LABOR IN A CHANGING WORLD, are due Feb. 20, 2020.

The conference will be held May 20-23, 2020 at Youngstown State University, in Youngstown, Ohio, and more information is available at the conference website, here.

2020 con logo

Reminder: Proposals for WCSA 2020 Conference Due Feb. 20!

Proposals for the Working-Class Studies Association’s 2020 conference, on RE-PLACING CLASS: COMMUNITY, POLITICS, WORK, AND LABOR IN A CHANGING WORLD, are due Feb. 20, 2020.

The conference will be held May 20-23, 2020 at Youngstown State University, in Youngstown, Ohio, and more information is available at the conference website, here.

2020 con logo

Website for WCSA’s 2020 Conference Up!

The website for the Working-Class Studies Association’s 2020 Conference is now available! Here is the link: https://ysu.edu/wcsa-2020-conference

The 2020 conference theme is RE-PLACING CLASS: COMMUNITY, POLITICS, WORK, AND LABOR IN A CHANGING WORLD. Proposals are due Feb. 20, 2020.

The conference will be held May 20-23, 2020 at Youngstown State University, in Youngstown, Ohio.

On the website, you can see the call for proposals, submit proposals, review information about accommodations, and see announcements about the plenary address.

Tenure-Track Positions at the ILR School, Cornell University

The Industrial & Labor Relations School at Cornell University is hiring in a number of areas this year. ILR is the world’s leading college focused on work, employment, and labor issues, with faculty from a number of disciplinary backgrounds. Brief position descriptions and links to the full listings are below. Cornell University is an equal opportunity employer, and women and minority candidates are strongly encouraged to apply.

Tenure-Track Position in Labor Movements and Collective Representation
(https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/14116)

Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR) invites applications to fill a tenure-track faculty position at the assistant professor level in Labor Movements and Collective Representation to begin August 2020. Applicants should have research and teaching interests related to labor movements or other forms of collective worker representation. A demonstrated potential for high quality teaching and research leading to publication in top-tier journals is essential. At the time of appointment, applicants must have completed a Ph.D. in industrial relations, sociology, political science, anthropology, management, or other related disciplines. Interested candidates should submit a cover letter, vita, research statement, teaching statement, diversity and inclusion statement, writing sample, and three reference letters. Review of applications will begin October 1, 2019. Inquiries about this position should be directed to Prof. Virginia Doellgast (vld7@cornell.edu), Prof. Kate Griffith (kategriffith@cornell.edu), Prof. Shannon Gleeson (smg338@cornell.edu), or Prof. Sarosh Kuruvilla (sck4@cornell.edu).

Tenure-Track Position in International and Comparative Labor & Employment Law
(https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/14115)

Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR) invites applications to fill a tenure-track faculty position (at the assistant, associate or full professor level) in International and Comparative Labor & Employment Law to begin August 2020. Applicants should have research and teaching interests related to international and comparative labor & employment law. A demonstrated potential for high quality teaching and research leading to publication in top-tier journals is essential. Policy-oriented experience in the field of international and comparative labor & employment law is desirable. At the time of appointment, applicants must have completed a J.D. and/or a Ph.D. in industrial relations, sociology, political science, management, or other related disciplines. Interested candidates should submit a cover letter, vita, research statement, teaching statement, diversity and inclusion statement,writing sample, and three reference letters. Review of applications will begin October 1, 2019. Inquiries about this position should be directed to Prof. Virginia Doellgast (vld7@cornell.edu), Prof. Kate Griffith (kategriffith@cornell.edu), Prof. Shannon Gleeson (smg338@cornell.edu), or Prof. Sarosh Kuruvilla (sck4@cornell.edu).

Tenure-Track Position in Organizational Behavior
(https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/14092)

The Department of Organizational Behavior in the ILR School at Cornell University invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position, to begin August 2020. Applicants should have research and teaching interests related to meso or macro organizational behavior. We will consider applications at all ranks, but prioritize those at the assistant or untenured associate level. Evidence of very strong research and teaching potential is essential, including publications or papers in process at top-tier journals in management or sociology. At the time of appointment, applicants must have completed their Ph.D. in organizational behavior, management, sociology, or related fields. The ILR School provides a rich intellectual environment for organizational scholars, with strong ties to the Sociology and Psychology Departments and the SC Johnson College of Business. OB faculty members are actively involved in research centers and initiatives at the ILR School and across the University. All candidates should submit a cover letter, vita, research statement, teaching statement, diversity and inclusion statement, writing sample, and three reference letters. The deadline for submission of all application materials is October 1, 2019. Questions about the position can be directed to Marya Besharov (mlb363@cornell.edu), Vanessa Bohns (vkb28@cornell.edu), or Diane Burton (burton@cornell.edu).

First-Generation Students

WCSA members Colby King, associate professor of sociology, and Sean McPherson, assistant professor of art, (both of Bridgewater State University) contributed to an article on understanding the needs of first-generation students on campus. “New Territory: Ensuring First-Generation Students Feel at Home and Succeed on Campus” appeared in Bridgewater Magazine.

King will start a new position in the fall as assistant professor of sociology at the University of South Carolina at Upstate.  Click here to read his views on what the next generation of working-class Americans will look like.

 

WCSA 2019 Conference Update

The final program for the WCSA 2019 conference, “Beyond the Heartlands,” at the University of Kent is now available.  The conference website contains information on registration, conference fringe, and membership.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter: @wcstudies and @DIndustrialKent